As regular CFZ-watchers will know, for some time Corinna has been doing a column for Animals & Men and a regular segment on On The Track... particularly about out-of-place birds and rare vagrants. There seem to be more and more bird stories from all over the world hitting the news these days so, to make room for them all - and to give them all equal and worthy coverage - she has set up this new blog to cover all things feathery and Fortean.

Thursday, 25 August 2016

African birds show signs of biasness between biological and step off-springs

3 hours ago
Washington D.C., Aug. 24 : A recent biological research has found an African desert-dwelling male bird that favours his biological sons and alienates his step-sons.

Southern Pied Babbler.jpgMartha Nelson, the researcher, said: "Nepotism has likely played a vital role in the evolution of family life in this species."

The species is the southern pied babbler, a black and white bird found in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe.

These birds live in groups and chicks are raised by both parents as well as other adult birds. The groups can range in size from three to up to 14 birds.

The group's dominant male bird appears to decide which of the subordinate males to tolerate in the group.

Nelson's research shows subordinate male birds spend less time in a group if they are unrelated to the dominant male bird.

These subordinate male birds are essentially pushed out of the group by their stepdads or in some cases their brothers-in-law. They are then forced to join other groups as subordinates or to live alone.

Over the course of five years in the summer, Nelson observed 45 different groups of southern pied babblers in the Kalahari Desert, walking around with the birds at dawn and dusk.

She also relied on data collected by her co-author Amanda Ridley. Together, the researchers analyzed data from 11 years of observation.

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