As regular CFZ-watchers will know, for some time Corinna has been doing a column for Animals & Men and a regular segment on On The Track... particularly about out-of-place birds and rare vagrants. There seem to be more and more bird stories from all over the world hitting the news these days so, to make room for them all - and to give them all equal and worthy coverage - she has set up this new blog to cover all things feathery and Fortean.

Sunday, 26 February 2017

'Extinct' birds to fly from new habitat




Syed Akbar | TNN | Updated: Jan 25, 2017, 09.17 AM IST
Centre accords priority to Jerdon's Courser and Great Indian Bustard, critically endangered birds of Andhra Pradesh in National Wildlife Action Plan 2017-31.

An alternative habitat for these birds will be identified and developed to save these birds from extinction.

HYDERABAD: Jerdon's Courser and Great Indian Bustard, the critically endangered birds of Andhra Pradesh, got a new 'lease of life' with the Centre according priority to these avian species in National Wildlife Action Plan 2017-31. The birds were earlier included in the five-year species recovery plan, which ended with a whimper last year.

Now, an alternative habitat for these birds will be identified and developed in the next four years to save these birds from extinction.

Jerdon's Courser is endemic to Andhra Pradesh and thrives only in
Lankamalleswara Wildlife Sanctuary in Kadapa district.Only a handful of Jerdon's Coursers are believed to be alive, though the bird was last seen a decade ago. Incidentally, the species became `extinct' and was `rediscovered' twice in last 180 years. It went extinct in 1846 and 1900, but sighted in 1986. The place of its `reappearance' in Kadapa has been declared a wildlife sanctuary.


The Great Indian Bustard is also critically endangered and lives in six states in India, including Andhra Pradesh. Only 300 birds are estimated to exist in the world. Number of birds in its exclusive sanctuary, Rollapadu in Kurnool district, has seen a sharp dip, according to researcher Mohammed Ghouse of
Osmania College in Kurnool. Telangana or any other south Indian state does not have this bird. Centre's latest wildlife action plan calls for "safeguarding genetically pure populations from future genetic contamination". It also lays emphasis on identification of "suitable alternative homes for species with single isolated populations such as Jerdon's Courser". The Centre proposes to create alternative habitat for this rare bird by 2021. The task has been entrusted to AP forest department. The Union ministry of environment, forests and climate change will supervise the action plan.Technical support will be taken from scientific and research institutions to achieve the goal. 

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