As regular CFZ-watchers will know, for some time Corinna has been doing a column for Animals & Men and a regular segment on On The Track... particularly about out-of-place birds and rare vagrants. There seem to be more and more bird stories from all over the world hitting the news these days so, to make room for them all - and to give them all equal and worthy coverage - she has set up this new blog to cover all things feathery and Fortean.

Thursday, 1 February 2018

Why roosters don't go deaf from their own loud crowing


January 30, 2018 by Bob Yirka, Phys.org report

A team of researchers with the University of Antwerp and the University of Ghent, both in Belgium, has uncovered the means by which roosters prevent themselves from going deaf due to their own loud crowing. In their paper published in the journal Zoology, the group outlines their study of the birds and what they found.

Anyone who has ever lived on a farm has heard the familiar sound of the crowing rooster (male chicken). Few likely realize, however, just how loud that crowing can be. In this new effort, the researchers sought to measure how loud the crowing is, and how the rooster avoids deafness from hearing itself every morning.

The team placed a tiny microphone near the ears of sample roosters to measure how loud the crowing would sound to them. They found it was louder than thought—averaging over 100 decibels, which is roughly the same as running a chainsaw. People who regularly use chainsaws without ear protection, it should be noted, go deaf over time due to damage to the tiny hair cells in the inner ear. Chickens of both genders also have such hairs in their ears, and the team wondered why they weren't damaged. To find out, they performed micro-computerized tomography scans on the skulls of the birds.

They discovered that half of the birds' eardrum was covered by a bit of soft tissue that dampened incoming noise. They also found that when the rooster tilted its head back to crow, another bit of material covered the ear canal completely, serving as a built-in ear-plug. Thus, for the rooster, it is as if someone were sticking their fingers in their ears while they are crowing. The researchers noted the birds also have another advantage—unlike humans, birds can regrow damaged hair cells. As for why the hens and chicks do not suffer hearing damage from the male crowing, though not mentioned in the research, it is well known that roosters tend to seek a vantage point offering maximum reach when they crow (away from the hens and chicks), making sure everyone within earshot knows that the hens that live there are his.

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