As regular CFZ-watchers will know, for some time Corinna has been doing a column for Animals & Men and a regular segment on On The Track... particularly about out-of-place birds and rare vagrants. There seem to be more and more bird stories from all over the world hitting the news these days so, to make room for them all - and to give them all equal and worthy coverage - she has set up this new blog to cover all things feathery and Fortean.

Sunday, 18 November 2018

Con­ser­va­tion areas help bird­life ad­apt to cli­mate change



Date: November 12, 2018
Source: University of Helsinki
A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species.
A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted Finnish study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species.
As the climate warms up, the belts of current climate conditions move further north, forcing species to follow the climate suited to them. At the same time, environmental transformation by humans is causing problems. Species are experiencing great difficulties in adapting simultaneously to a decrease in the quality of their habitat and the pressure brought on by climate change.
The study investigated changes in the abundance of bird species inside and outside conservation areas over five decades. According to observations made by the researchers, conservation areas are excellent habitats for many species. These areas help northern bird species maintain their abundances on the southern boundary of their current area of distribution, while helping certain southern bird species spread to new territories on the northern boundary of their distribution area.

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