As regular CFZ-watchers will know, for some time Corinna has been doing a column for Animals & Men and a regular segment on On The Track... particularly about out-of-place birds and rare vagrants. There seem to be more and more bird stories from all over the world hitting the news these days so, to make room for them all - and to give them all equal and worthy coverage - she has set up this new blog to cover all things feathery and Fortean.

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Human and avian running on uneven ground




Date: September 29, 2016
Source: Friedrich Schiller University Jena

Humans and birds adapt their movement when running on uneven ground. "And even though their adaptation mechanisms and strategies developed completely independently, they do so in very similar ways," says Dr Roy Müller from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). Together with colleagues he has published a review article in the current issue of the Journal of the Royal Society Interface in which they analyse human and avian locomotion on uneven ground.

An experience anybody who goes running in the forest has surely had: Running on uneven grounds or cross-country, you suddenly step on a rock or a root crossing your way or you come across a small hollow. You step into an empty space or on an obstacle, either way disrupting your running rhythm. "Yet, even at a rather fast pace, situations like these usually do not make us lose our balance," says kinesiologist Dr Roy Müller from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). The reason: Bipedal runners -- and humans count among them -- have various adaptation strategies stabilizing movement in their fast locomotion.

Together with his colleague Dr Yvonne Blum and the British researcher Dr Aleksandra Birn-Jeffery, Dr Müller has published a review article in the current issue of the Journal of the Royal Society Interface in which they analyse human and avian locomotion on uneven ground.




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