As regular CFZ-watchers will know, for some time Corinna has been doing a column for Animals & Men and a regular segment on On The Track... particularly about out-of-place birds and rare vagrants. There seem to be more and more bird stories from all over the world hitting the news these days so, to make room for them all - and to give them all equal and worthy coverage - she has set up this new blog to cover all things feathery and Fortean.

Thursday, 6 September 2018

How does agriculture affect vulnerable insect-eating birds?



Date:  August 29, 2018
Source:  American Ornithological Society Publications Office
Aerial insectivores -- birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing -- are declining across North America as agricultural intensification leads to diminishing insect abundance and diversity in many areas. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications looks at how Tree Swallows' diets are affected by agriculture and finds that while birds living in cropland can still find their preferred prey, they may be working harder to get it.
The University of Saskatchewan's Chantel Michelson, Robert Clark, and Christy Morrissey monitored Tree Swallow nest boxes at agricultural and grassland sites in 2012 and 2013, collecting blood samples from the birds to determine what they were eating via isotope ratios in their tissues. Tree Swallows usually prefer aquatic insects, which they capture in the air after they emerge from wetlands to complete their life cycles. The researchers suspected that birds living in crop-dominated areas would be forced to shift to eating more terrestrial insects, due to the effects of insecticide use and other agricultural practices on wetland habitat.
Instead, they found that swallows were eating more aquatic than terrestrial insects at all sites, and in 2012 it was actually the grassland birds whose diet contained a higher proportion of terrestrial insects. The results suggest that wetland habitat may provide a buffer against the negative effects of agriculture. However, birds living in cropland weighed less on average than their grassland-dwelling counterparts -- a sign that they may be struggling.

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